Wu Bo-Ping


Wu Bo-Ping (吴伯平) was born on June 20, 1935 in Shanghai, China. In addition to his long-term apprenticeship with Qin Bo-Wei, he studied with many other famous 20th-century doctors such as Zhao Bing-Nan, Ren Yin-Qiu, and Zhu Yan. He was also trained academically, graduating from first-class of the newly established Beijing College of Chinese Medicine in 1962.

Over his almost 50 years of extensive clinical experience, he has traveled the world teaching Chinese medicine and held key positions at schools such as Zhejiang College of Chinese Medicine (Hangzhou, China), The Academy of Chinese Medicine (Beijing, China), Seattle Institute of Oriental medicine (SIOM) (USA), The Institute of Chinese Medicine (London, UK), and the European Institute of Oriental Medicine (Munich, Germany). In addition, he has been involved in many research projects and has been involved in editing prestigious journals such as the Zhejiang Chinese Medicine Journal. He currently resides in Hangzhou, China where he until recently maintained a busy private practice.

Although he is known worldwide as a teacher, Professor Wu’s true talent lies in the clinic. His clinical approach follows in the footsteps of great physicians such as Qin Bo-Wei, Ding Gan-Ren, and Ye Tian-Shi. That is, he favors a therapeutic strategy that employs light and mild medicinals with smaller doses. He specializes in the treatment of complex diseases such as autoimmune disorders and dermatology. Not only is Wu known for his outstanding clinical results but also his deep understanding of classical Chinese medicine and how to utilize this in the clinic.

Much like his mentor Qin Bo-Wei, Wu has an incredible knack for explaining complex ideas in a straightforward manner. This, along with his close personal relationship with Dr. Qin, makes Wu an ideal person to provide clinical commentary on Qin’s original text. All the commentary contained within this book is Wu Bo-Ping’s, except for small segments taken from Qin’s other writings. Moreover, we have made a great effort to illustrate both Qin’s and Wu’s clinical thought process, instead of merely listing herbs and formulas for a given pattern. Wu’s commentary therefore provides an invaluable part of this book, explaining Qin’s thinking and bringing it to life.

 

Excerpt taken from Eastland Press’s book, Qin Bo-Wei’s New Guidelines for Treatment: 56 methods. With clinical commentary by Wu Bo-Ping (working title), to be published in 2011 written and trtanslated by Jason Blalack.